Album Review: Bleachers – ‘Gone Now’

Album Review: Bleachers – ‘Gone Now’
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While he’s not writing stadium-ready pop hits for Taylor Swift, Lorde, and Carly Rae Jepsen, Jack Antonoff is Bleachers – his ’80s-esque pop-rock project – and he’s completely authentic, and himself. Bleachers’ bold second album Gone Now symbolizes a significant part in Antonoff’s life, explaining that all of what Bleachers creates comes from this room that he grew up in. He tells fans on Twitter that “we can’t take it all with us.” That’s what Gone Now is about.

Gone Now feels more like a movie and less like music. Each song is penned so eloquently, the whole album could soundtrack a John Hughes film. There are standouts: “Don’t Take The Money,” a Vince Clarke-produced anthem about not selling out, “Everybody Lost Somebody,” a heart-on-sleeve ballad, and “I Miss Those Days,” taking away some Aim & Ignite influences from the days of the band fun.

Like Bleachers’ debut album, Strange Desire, there is not a single bad song on this album. The twelve-track sophomore full-length both surprises but sounds the same. Gone Now pays tribute to Antonoff’s idols, The Beatles and Bruce Springsteen. It’s a bit poppier, it’s also a bit heady – much of the lyrical themes tie into each other – “Goodbye” uses the “Everybody Lost Somebody” chorus, but also the opener “Dream of Mickey Mantle” ties in a Strange Desire full-circle theme in “I want to be grateful.” Closing with the dreamy love ballad “Nothing Is U,” then a reprise song, and the self-reflective “Foreign Girls,” Bleachers’ Gone Now is passionate and fearlessly bright. There’s not a single bad song on this album.

Bleachers – Gone Now
Release: June 2, 2017 – RCA Records

Rating: 9/10 – Brad LaPlante
Replay Worthy: “Don’t Take The Money,” “Everybody Lost Somebody”
Buy it, Stream it, or Skip it?: Buy it. Listen to it. All of it. These songs are too good.

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